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Keepin’ it real: research integrity, manuscript trustworthiness, and data reliability

  • Amir Aviram
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: Amir A. Aviram, MD.
    Affiliations
    Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, AN Women & Babies Program, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    and Temerty Faculty of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
    Search for articles by this author
      In 1998, Wakefield et al
      • Wakefield AJ
      • Murch SH
      • Anthony A
      • et al.
      Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children.
      published an astonishing observation in the Lancet. They reported an association between exposure to the Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) vaccines and autism spectrum disorders. Although this report was published in the “Early Report” section of the journal, it still echoed worldwide and stirred the pot of vaccination avoidance. Even after its retraction, more than 2 decades later, it carries tremendous influence. A quick literature search reveals that fraudulent scientific manuscripts in the peer-reviewed literature are not as rare as one might think, and the complex consequences of such occurrences span deep and wide.
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      References

        • Wakefield AJ
        • Murch SH
        • Anthony A
        • et al.
        Ileal-lymphoid-nodular hyperplasia, non-specific colitis, and pervasive developmental disorder in children.
        Lancet. 1998; 351: 637-641
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